Tech That Helps With Diabetic Ulcers – A “Progressive” Message from Insurance Thought Leadership

This message from Dr. Michael Shaw – a biochemist and public health advocate (with diabetes) just penned this most progressive post on the Insurance Thought Leadership blog. Can we make common-sense remote patient monitoring (RPM) treatment / prevention pay? We have got to try

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The Epigenetics of Negative Pressure Wound Therapy? DNA Methylation and healing of diabetic foot ulcers #NPWT #ActAgainstAmputation #DiabeticFoot

Fascinating and potentially impactful work from colleagues from Krakow regarding analysis and reporting of DNA methylation during NPWT. OBJECTIVE: Negative pressure wound therapy (NPWT) has been used to treat diabetic foot ulcerations (DFUs). Its action on the molecular level, however, is only partially understood. Some earlier data suggested NPWT may be mediated through modification of […]

Read More The Epigenetics of Negative Pressure Wound Therapy? DNA Methylation and healing of diabetic foot ulcers #NPWT #ActAgainstAmputation #DiabeticFoot

DFCon19- 550 Delegates, 50 Nations Gather to #ActAgainstAmputation and Honor @GUMedicine John Steinberg #DiabeticFoot

The 19th annual Global Diabetic Foot Conference (DFCon19) concluded this weekend in Hollywood. It featured delegates from 50 nations plus 30 streaming online. Lecturers ranged from shoe making in Pakistan to Next-Gen Vascular and Charcot Reconstruction to Epidermal Electronics to Cloud Computing from Microsoft. A highlight of the symposium included Edward James Olmos Award for […]

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Foot ulceration and its association with mortality in diabetes: Meta analysis suggests 2.3-fold greater risk year over year #DiabeticFoot

Even as amputations stabilize or reduce in many parts of the world, more troubling is the morbidity and mortality associated with diabetic foot ulcers. Bottom line: DFUs are associated with a 2.3-fold greater risk for year over year mortality than people without DFU. Congratulations to Saluja, Jude and others for this important work. Abstract Background […]

Read More Foot ulceration and its association with mortality in diabetes: Meta analysis suggests 2.3-fold greater risk year over year #DiabeticFoot

A Significant Drop in Major Amputation Worldwide: Message from the @OECD @APMA #DiabeticFoot #ActAgainstAmputation

Important work from Carinci, Uccioli and coworkers evaluating 21 nations within the Organization for Economic Cooperation (OECD) showed a massive 30.6% reduction in major amputation between 2000 and 2013 with minor amputations (foot-level) remaining stable. These were for all-cause amputation, but diabetes was equally reduced (29%).

Read More A Significant Drop in Major Amputation Worldwide: Message from the @OECD @APMA #DiabeticFoot #ActAgainstAmputation

WIFI + Functional Score: “Can we preserve this limb?” meets “Should we preserve this limb?” #ActAgainstAmputation #DiabeticFoot

We at SALSA and other colleagues worldwide have been using a functional score to follow up with WIFI’s initial limb threat score. In essence, initial WIFI survey asks “Can we practically preserve this limb” Functional assessment asks “Should we preserve this limb?”

Read More WIFI + Functional Score: “Can we preserve this limb?” meets “Should we preserve this limb?” #ActAgainstAmputation #DiabeticFoot

Research symposiums showcase how @USCs faculty serves public good

BY Jenesse Miller This week, as USC celebrates the inauguration of Carol L. Folt as the university’s 12th president, two symposiums are taking place Wednesday and Thursday with TED-Talk-style presentations highlighting innovative work from USC faculty. With nearly $900 million in research expenditures in the last fiscal year, USC pursues new innovations, discoveries and solutions to the world’s […]

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