Genome Mapped for Type 2 Diabetes

This is courtesy of the always vigilant Alex Escalante!

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Genome Mapped for Type 2 Diabetes

FRIDAY, Feb. 5 (HealthDay News) — Scientists have completed a map of areas of the human genome that control which genes are switched on or off in type 2 diabetes, a finding that may advance understanding of the genetic basis of this and other common diseases.

“Most of the human genome is uncharted territory — entire stretches of sequence with no clear function or purpose,” study co-senior author Jason Lieb, an associate professor of biology at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, said in a news release.

“In fact, the majority of the DNA sequences associated with disease found thus far reside in the middle of nowhere. Here we have developed a map that can guide scientists to regions of the genome that do appear to be functionally relevant, instead of a dead end.”

Using a new method (called FAIRE-seq) developed in Lieb’s laboratory, the researchers produced the first high-resolution atlas of these regulatory elements in pancreatic islet cells, the most studied cell type for the treatment and prevention of type 2 diabetes.

The study was published online recently in Nature Genetics.

This map is likely to help identify new genetic targets for understanding and treating type 2 diabetes, but the method used in this study isn’t limited to diabetes or pancreatic islet cells. Lieb plans to use FAIRE-seq to investigate other cells, including immune cells.

More information

The U.S. National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases has more about diabetes.

David G. Armstrong

Dedicated to amputation prevention, wound healing, diabetic foot, biotechnology and the intersection between medical devices and consumer electronics.

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