Visceral Fat NOT Obesity Increases Risk of Diabetes

Visceral Fat Not Obesity Increases Risk of Diabetes:

Fascinating study from colleagues at UT Southwestern in Dallas, TX. In summary:

In participants without diabetes at baseline, a number of factors were significantly and independently associated with incident diabetes in obese adults:
  • Elevated visceral fat: OR 2.42, 95% CI 1.59 to 3.68 (P
  • Elevated systolic blood pressure: OR 1.26, 95% CI 1.07 to 1.48 (P=0.006)
  • Elevated fructosamine levels: OR 1.95, 95% CI 1.43 to 2.67 (P
  • Elevated fasting blood glucose: OR 1.88, 95% CI 1.38 to 2.56 (P
  • Weight gain from baseline: OR 1.06, 95% CI 1.02 to 1.10 (P=0.002)
  • Family history of diabetes: OR 2.32, 95% CI 1.25 to 4.29 (P=0.008)
There were no associations for BMI, total body fat, or abdominal subcutaneous fat, they reported. Additionally, among participants with normal fasting blood glucose at baseline, factors significantly associated with incident prediabetes and diabetes were:
  • Higher visceral fat mass: OR 1.48, 95% CI 1.17 to 1.88 (P=0.001)
  • Elevated fructosamine levels: OR 1.42, 95% CI 1.14 to 1.75 (P=0.001)
  • Elevated insulin level: OR 1.34, 95% CI 1.06 to 1.70 (P=0.01)
  • Older age, per 10 years: OR 1.48, 95% CI 1.17 to 1.86 (P=0.001)
  • Non-white race: OR 1.77, 95% CI 1.08 to 2.91 (P=0.02)
  • Family history of diabetes: OR 1.60, 95% CI 1.05 to 2.44 (P=0.03)
  • Weight gain from baseline: OR 1.08, 95% CI 1.05 to 1.10 (P

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