Transmetatarsal and Minor Amputation Versus Major Leg Amputation: 30-Day Readmissions, Reamputations, and Complications #ActAgainstAmputation #DiabeticFoot

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Transmetatarsal and Minor Amputation Versus Major Leg Amputation: 30-Day Readmissions, Reamputations, and Complications

Aims: The optimal level of lower-extremity amputation, particularly in diabetic patients with ulceration, is debated. Proximal amputations more greatly decrease function versus distal amputations, but healing and compli- cation rates may differ between the 2 types. This study compares early postoperative outcomes after transmeta- tarsal and other partial foot amputations and major leg amputations.

Methods: Data were derived from National Surgical Quality Improvement Program datasets covering 2012 to 2014. Outcomes studied include 30-day rates of readmission to hospital for wound complications. We matched the 2 types of amputation patients by propensity score to fairly compare between levels of amputation when either type of amputation might be indicated. The same analysis was then performed with emphasis on diabetic patients. Results: Major amputation patients were more likely to have dependent functional status, although their surgeries tended to be more complicated. Minor amputation patients had 2.5 times the odds of irrigation and debridement compared with major amputation patients, but only 0.49 and 0.47 times the odds of urinary tract infection or transfusion, respectively.

Conclusions: Although short-term complications, readmissions, and reoperations were more common in distal amputation, UTI and the need for transfusion were higher in major amputation.

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