Putting Feet First: Official Report from the UK’s National Health Service (NHS)

This link might be helpful to those interested in care of the diabetic foot.

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Putting feet first – Commissioning specialist services for the management and prevention of diabetic foot disease in hospitals (PDF) 630KB

Reports and statistics

Putting feet first

Commissioning specialist services for the management and prevention of diabetic foot disease in hospitals

Diabetes is one of the biggest health challenges facing the UK today. Diabetes is a serious condition that can lead to life-shattering complications of heart disease, stroke, kidney failure, blindness and amputation.

Delivery of safe, clinically effective and person-centred care is an essential part of achieving the aspirations of the NHS Next Stage Review.

Disease of the foot is a complication of diabetes caused by damage to the nerves and blood vessels that serve the limbs, but worryingly one in three people with diabetes do not realise that having the condition puts them more at risk of having an amputation.

It is reported that up to 100 people a week in the UK have a limb amputated as a result of diabetes. People at highest risk are those who have a previous history of ulcers, neuropathy or nerve damage and circulatory problems.

Foot ulcers and other changes need to be assessed as soon as possible by an expert team. The longer they are left untreated, the greater the risk of deterioration and loss of the limb, with all the resultant adverse effects on mobility, disfigurement, mood and independence.

Diabetes UK is pleased to have been working together with partners to produce this guidance to enable proper management of acute onset, or deteriorating, disease of the diabetic foot – and prevent amputation.

Commissioners need to work together with providers, healthcare professionals and people with diabetes within local diabetes networks to deliver high-quality integrated care.

The consequences of diabetic foot disease are far reaching, and it must not be ignored.

David G. Armstrong

Dedicated to amputation prevention, wound healing, diabetic foot, biotechnology and the intersection between medical devices and consumer electronics.

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