#Obesity costs the global economy as much as war and terrorism, totalling $2T/yr @UofA @UAhealthnet

This summary from the Daily Mail:

Childhood-Obesity-Facts

 

  • More than 2.1 billion people across the world are overweight or obese 
  • That equates to around 30% of the world’s population
  • By 2030 experts predict half of all adults will be overweight or obese
  • Obesity costs the global economy $2 trillion each year
  • In the UK the burden is £47 billion a year, while in the U.S. it is £663 billion
  • Experts studied 44 different interventions to help tackle obesity
  • They looked at healthier school meals, calorie labelling, restrictions on advertising high-calorie food and drink, and public health campaigns
  • Found no single intervention will work but combined strategy would
  • Called on global Governments, healthcare systems, retailers and food and drink manufacturers to work together to tackle obesity head on  

Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/health/article-2842212/Obesity-costs-global-economy-war-terrorism-totalling-2TRILLION-year.html#ixzz3JcCKHl7D

David G. Armstrong

Dedicated to amputation prevention, wound healing, diabetic foot, biotechnology and the intersection between medical devices and consumer electronics.

One comment

  • Look, being fat does NOT automatically mean you will end up with type 2 diabetes. I’ve been fat for almost 40 of my 62 years of life (350+ lbs, at 5′ 8″) and I STILL don’t have type 2 diabetes, in spite of being told for the last 30 years that I will die of t2d. But then again, I don’t have any family members who have t2d either, and t2d is VERY much one of those genetic diseases. However, my husband was diagnosed with t2d when he was 38 (he’s now 60). He wasn’t fat at the time (he was in the Navy), but he is now (BMI is 32). Of course, both his parents had t2d, and so do 5 of his 6 brothers.
    Correlation is NOT causation, and I’m sick and tired of hearing that obesity is the cause of diabetes. If that’s the case, then WhyTF do thin people get t2d? And do you tell them to lose weight in order to cure it or prevent it from happening? No? You only tell that to fat people? Why is that? Because you don’t have a cure and telling people that if they’re thin, they’ll avoid all these diseases takes the onus off you and puts it on the patient instead. Yeah, that really helps the patient, doesn’t it?

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