Non-Invasive Brain-Computer Interface for Complex Control of Robotic Arm 

Advanced brain-computer interfaces that can be used to control the complex motion of powered robotic arms and hands have relied on electrodes implanted in These have serious downsides that currently make them impractical for use outside of scientific research. A team at University of Minnesota has now created a control system that relies on traditional non-invasive electroencephalography (EEG) to allow people to use a robotic arm to grasp, move, and place objects in front of them.

Source: Non-Invasive Brain-Computer Interface for Complex Control of Robotic Arm | Medgadget

David G. Armstrong

Dedicated to amputation prevention, wound healing, diabetic foot, biotechnology and the intersection between medical devices and consumer electronics.