RxForSuccess Podcast- David G. Armstrong: The Storyteller

What a pleasure to participate with master interviewer Dr. Randy Cook in this great visit on the Rxforsuccess podcast.

The Communicator: Bradley Block, MD Rx for Success Podcast

Bradley Block, MD, is an otolaryngologist – head and neck surgeon on Long Island, New York, where he lives with his wife and three young sons. He is a partner at ENT and Allergy Associates and he created the Physician’s Guide to Doctoring Podcast. It is a scintillating and engaging podcast, where he interviews physician and non-physician experts to help teach us what we should have been learning while we were busy memorizing Kreb’s Cycle. It is a practical guide for practicing physicians, physicians-in-training and all allied health professionals. Topics range from personal finance to politics to improving interactions with patients to what every doctor should know about different specialties. You can find him at PhysiciansGuidetoDoctoring.com and on Twitter @physiciansguide Unlock Bonus content and get the shows early on our Patreon Subscribe: Apple Podcasts | Google Podcasts | Stitcher | Amazon  | Spotify   Michael L. Relvas, is a CFP professional and insurance agent committed to helping physicians nationwide with their term life and disability insurance needs. He provides an objective, transparent and education-focused process that aims to help physicians make prudent decisions and avoid over-complicating things. He exclusively offers Own-Occupation disability insurance policies for residents, fellows, and attending physicians. We really like Michael and know he’s got your best interest at heart when it comes to disability insurance. We know he’d be happy to help you with whatever your needs are. You can find Michael at doctorpodcastnetwork.com/mrinsurance or contact him at 800-817-4522. Show notes at https://rxforsuccesspodcast.com/45 Report-out with comments or feedback at https://rxforsuccesspodcast.com/report
  1. The Communicator: Bradley Block, MD
  2. The Organizer: Dr. Kimberly Jackson, MD
  3. 43. The Designer: Jessica Lubahn, MD
  4. 42. The Storyteller: Emily Silverman, MD
  5. 41. The Pioneer : Mari Lipartia, MD

Dr. Armstrong’s Prescription for Success:

Number 1: Folks don’t care how much you know, until they know how much you care: Show a sincere interest in the person in front of you, not just their problem..

Number 2: Don’t be a what I call a kiss up, kick down kind of person: Be the leader who knows the name of everyone that he or she sees when he or she is walking into work. Those interactions, those relationships are ultimately the most meaningful.

Number 3: Don’t procrastinate: Run your list and if you can get something done now, get it done now.

Number 4: Hard things are hard for a reason: Just because something is hard, doesn’t mean it’s not worthwhile. If given the choice between doing that thing that’s hard and clocking out for the day, do the thing that’s hard and you’ll grow because you did.

Number 5: The best gift you can give anyone, besides your love, is perspective: Periodically, step back and try to regard what you’re doing. No matter how great your work, if you regard what you’re doing, you’ll find little bits and pieces you can tweak.

Number 6: Be a collector of mentors and learn from them: Pay them respect by seeking their advice and guidance.

Connect with Dr. Armstrong:

Email: armstrong@usa.net

Website: diabeticfootonline.com

Faculty website: https://keck.usc.edu/faculty-search/david-g-armstrong/

Notable Quotes from Dr. Armstrong’s interview

The greatest gift you can give people is to make them feel better.

A lot of the work we do in tissue repair and wound healing and limb preservation is treating people that do not have the gift of pain. So a lot of times, our success is often measured in millimeters and over months and years, not just in that one patient visit.

Nothing ruins a good surgery, like follow up.

I think, ultimately, we’re not judged by how many manuscripts we’ve written, how many lectures we’ve given and how many countries? How many cylinders are in our car, how many dollars are in our bank account, or how much money we’ve gotten in grants. All that’s great, and it’s fun to keep score on that stuff. But ultimately, it’s a fleeting thing. I think we’re judged by our personal progeny, both your children and your professional progeny.

There’s plenty of feet to go around.

(On Fellowship) How’d you like to make one fifth the amount of money, but five times the difference?

My greatest mentor is my wife.

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